governor

/ˈgʌvənə / (say 'guvuhnuh), /ˈgʌvnə / (say 'guvnuh)

noun
1. (often upper case) a person charged with the direction or control of an institution, society, etc.: governors of a bank; governor of a prison.
2. (often upper case)
a. the representative of the sovereign in an Australian state, holding mainly nominal executive powers.
b. the representative of the sovereign with statutory powers in a British dependent territory.
3. (often upper case) a ruler or chief magistrate appointed to govern a province, town, fort, or the like.
4. (often upper case) the executive head of a state in the US.
5. Machinery a device for regulating a supply of fuel in an engine for ensuring uniform speed regardless of the load.
6. Colloquial
a. one's employer.
b. any person of superior status.
c. one's father.
{Middle English governour, from Old French governeor, from Latin gubernātor steersman, director}

Australian English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Governor — Gov ern*or, n. [OE. governor, governour, OF. governeor, F. gouverneur, fr. L. gubernator steersman, ruler, governor. See {Govern}.] 1. One who governs; especially, one who is invested with the supreme executive authority in a State; a chief ruler …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • governor — gov‧er‧nor [ˈgʌvnə ǁ ərnər] noun [countable] 1. JOBS FINANCE the person in charge of an important organization such as a country s central bank: • the governor of the Bank of England 2. a member of the committee in control of an institution such …   Financial and business terms

  • governor — gov·er·nor / gə vər nər/ n: one that governs: as a: one that exercises authority esp. over an area or group b: an official elected or appointed to act as ruler, chief executive, or nominal head of a political unit; specif: the chief executive of… …   Law dictionary

  • governor — c.1300, gouernour, personal keeper, protector, guide, from O.Fr. governeor (11c., Mod.Fr. gouverneur) and directly from L. gubernatorem (nom. gubernator) director, ruler, governor, originally steersman, pilot (see GOVERN (Cf. govern)). Meaning… …   Etymology dictionary

  • governor — [guv′ə nər, guv′ərnər] n. [ME governour < OFr governeor < L gubernator, a pilot, steersman, governor] 1. a person who governs; esp., a) a person appointed to govern a dependency, province, town, fort, etc. ☆ b) the elected head of any state …   English World dictionary

  • Governor — (engl., spr. gowwĕrnĕr), s. Gouverneur …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • governor — [n] person administrating government administrator, boss, chief, chief of state, commander, comptroller, controller, director, executive, gubernatorial leader, guv*, head, head honcho*, leader, manager, overseer, presiding officer, ruler,… …   New thesaurus

  • governor — ► NOUN 1) an official appointed to govern a town or region. 2) the elected executive head of a US state. 3) the representative of the British Crown in a colony or in a Commonwealth state that regards the monarch as head of state. 4) the head of a …   English terms dictionary

  • Governor — For other uses, see governor (disambiguation). A governor (from French gouverneur) is a governing official, usually the executive (at least nominally, to different degrees also politically and administratively) of a non sovereign level of… …   Wikipedia

  • governor — /guv euhr neuhr, euh neuhr/, n. 1. the executive head of a state in the U.S. 2. a person charged with the direction or control of an institution, society, etc.: the governors of a bank; the governor of a prison. 3. Also called governor general.… …   Universalium

  • governor —    Probably the most frequent use of this term is in various parts of Britain, where working class men use it to address another man, usually one who is unknown to them. In his book The Cockney, Julian Franklyn writes:    ‘Guv’ner’, generally so… …   A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

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